ELIZABETH STIRLING

Elizabeth Stirling (1819-1895) was born in Greenwich, London, and studied music at the Royal Academy of Music with Edward Homes, W. B. Wilson, J. A. Hamilton and Sir George Macfarren. In 1837 she performed a recital at St. Katherine’s Church, Regent’s Park, which was reviewed by The Musical World. In 1839 she took a position as organist at All Saints’ Poplar Church. 1853, passed the examination for the degree of Mus. Bac. At Oxford but did not receive the degree, for at that time, no woman had yet been awarded a degree from the school. She is considered one of the finest of the English organists and published many organ works and over fifty part-songs. Her part-song “All Among the Barley” (1849) won a prize offered by Novello & Co. and became one of the most popular English part-songs. The song was so popular and became so ingrained in the culture, that it is now often referenced as a folk song.

 

All are SATB and unaccompanied unless noted in VOICING column. A noting of “div” indicates some divisi within a part or parts, but usually not a true independent part throughout the work. Solos and accompaniment are also noted.
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VOICING
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All among the barley

 

A. T.
UK
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Red leaves

F. G. Lee
UK
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Sleep, sleep, Baby, sleep

George Wither
UK
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